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Chase, Amos J.

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 40, credited to Middlesex, VT
Unit(s): 1st VT CAV
Service: enl 11/24/63, m/i 12/3/63, Pvt, Co. C, 1st VT CAV, tr to Co. A 6/21/65, m/o 8/9/65

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 02/27/1824, Sanbornton, NH
Death: 04/30/1906

Burial: Roxbury Cemetery, Roxbury, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Joe Schenkman

Findagrave Memorial #: 0
(There may be a Findagrave Memorial, but we have not recorded it)

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes, 4/18/1867; widow Elizabeth, 5/25/1906, VT
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: None

DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

Copyright notice

Tombstone

Roxbury Cemetery, Roxbury, VT

Check the cemetery for location/directions and other veterans who may be buried there.



Obituary

AMOS CHASE DEAD

Roxbury, April 30. - Amos J. Chase died at 1:30 o’clock this morning after a brief illness with pneumonia, he being taken ill Wednesday night. Mr. Chase was born in Henniker, N.H., Feb. 22, 1823 and was the son of William and Sarah Chase. He married Abigail Hastings and seven children were born, Miss Eliza, the oldest, is dead, Mrs. Florence Dawn, of Worcester, Mass., Melvin E. Chase, deputy sheriff, of Roxbury, Charles H. Chase, of St. Albans, George H. Chase, of Lebanon, N.H., Olin C. Chase, of Greenfield, Mass., and Rev. Lee Chase, of Stockbridge. His first wife did. He married for his second wife, fourteen years ago, Elizabeth Marshall but no children were born to them. She survives him. Mr. Chase enlisted in Co. C, 1st Vermont Cavalry in 1861, and served four years and four months. During his life he has lived in Berlin, Middlesex and Worcester. He came to Roxbury three years ago.

Source: Montpelier Evening Argus, April 30, 1906.
Courtesy of Tom Boudreau.