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Hulburd, Daniel Campbell

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 0, credited to Waterville, VT
Unit(s): 2nd VT INF
Service: enl 5/7/61, m/i 6/20/61, Pvt, Co. H, 2nd VT INF, dis/dsb 10/14/62

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: abt 1814, Milton, VT
Death: 10/29/1881

Burial: Woodbine Cemetery, Woodbine, IA
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Deanna French
Findagrave Memorial #: 64005933

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes, 1/2/1863; widow Mary J., 7/10/1890
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: None

DESCENDANTS

3rd Great Grandfather of Lynne Perez, San Antonio, TX

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BURIAL:

Copyright notice

Woodbine Cemetery, Woodbine, IA

Check the cemetery for location/directions and other veterans who may be buried there.


Daniel C. Hulburd

LAMOILLE NEWSDEALER, JULY 19, 1861

CAMP FAIRBANKS

WASHINGTON, D.C. JULY 19, 1861

DEAR NEWSDEALER, --- I thought to speak a word to you, and our friends generally (by your permission) through your welcome sheet.

We are now, and have been, since we arrived in this District, encamped on Capital Hill, about three-fourths of a mile east of the Capital. There are a dozen or fifteen camps in sight of us, and others are being pitched, while some of the regiments are moving off. How soon we will be ordered off we do not know, but rumor says in a day or two. Two hours later: Rumor now says we move at 3 o'clock in the morning, but where to we do not know,

Our boys of Company H, from Fletcher and vicinity, are all well and in good spirits except a few cases of slight summer complaint, yet there is some severe sickness in our regiment. Notwithstanding the weather is exceedingly warm, we all enjoy ourselves, we think better than those that enlisted with us., and possessed great courage and patriotism, until we get orders to prepare for marching and then come up missing as did some from from the northern part of Waterville.. If it proves true that the 2d Vermont regiment leave here today, I will give you notice of the same, and our wherabouts at my first opportunity.

Respectfully Yours

D.C. HULBURD

CAMP FAIRBANKS

Of Waterville, Vt.

Washington, D.C.


LAMOILLE NEWSDEALER: SEPT. 6, 1861

CHAIN BRIDGE, GEORGETOWN, D.C.

SEPTEMBER 2d, 1861

Dear Editor --- We of the 2d (or many of us) feel like being among near and good friends, when we have the pleasure of perusing your friendly sheet, so much so, if one of the "Newsdealers" is discovered, even among old cast off papers, it is sure to be examined, as was one the other day, and in it found the following:" In a private letter to a citizen of this place, it is said Eli Ellenwood from Cambridge, of Company H. is singing in camp", or to the same effect. Now this is true, but it is not all the truth, and I wish that no one would infer from the paragraph that Sergeant Ellenwood is merely a singer in camp. If his bravery, love of, and attachment to discipline, moral influence over his associates, and good sound judgment, were equaled by each member of one regiment, it would be more efficient in battle, or any other service, than any other two regiments on the ground, if I am any Judge; and I know of no one that would be more keenly missed than he, should he be taken from us, for he is respected by all, although he neglects no proper occasion for reproving any of us for profanity and other vices so common in military camps; and his promptness in duty and time, is worthy of imitation by us all.

A rebel spy has been taken through the instrumentality of one of our black cooks. The spy continued to get a pass from our Col., to cross Chain Bridge, and with it he passed to and fro several times when he was observed by the black, who had been at Manassas, and worked on the trenches with the spy for a master. He spoke to him but the spy did not know him. The black told a sergeant to examine his collar and see if he had not got dispatchs there, for he had heard him brag in Manassas of carrying them there. The officer did so, and found evidences of his guilt. So Mr. Spy was walked off to safe keeping. So you see the contraband are not useless, and they continue to come daily.

Yours, D.C. HULBURD

Co. H. Vt. V. M.

Submitted by Deanna French.