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Trow, George E.

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 20, credited to East Montpelier, VT
Unit(s): 2nd VT INF
Service: enl 8/20/61, m/i 9/12/61, Pvt, Co. H, 2nd VT INF, m/o 9/12/64, detailed as TMSTR at BGD or DIV level most of his enlistment

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 01/10/1835, Calais, VT
Death: 12/02/1918

Burial: South Woodbury Cemetery, Woodbury, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Heidi McColgan
Findagrave Memorial #: 79129502

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes, 2/28/1880; widow Caroline, 12/16/1918, VT
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: None

DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

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Tombstone

Tombstone

South Cemetery, Woodbury, VT

Check the cemetery for location/directions and other veterans who may be buried there.



Obituary

VETERAN OF CIVIL WAR PASSES AWAY

George C. Trow, Hardwick Resident for Half a Century and Prominent Business Man, Died Monday Afternoon

George Trow, aged 85 years, a resident of Hardwick for half a century, died at his home on Spring street last Monday afternoon at 5:30 o'clock, after several weeks' illness, death being due to complications attendant upon old age and a gradual failing health.

The funeral will be held at his late home tomorrow morning at ten o'clock, Rev. C. D. Hazelton officiating and interment will be made in the family lot at South Woodbury.

George Clark Trow was born in Woodbury, Vt., January 10, 1833, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Kindred Trow. He spent his boyhood and young manhood days in the town of his birth and in Calais, and received his early education in the district schools of those towns. At the age of 19 he learned the carpenter's trade. Which he has followed continuously and very successfully ever since, up to within a few weeks of his demise. He was also a successful building contractor.

In 1854 he was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Morse, and to this union 11 children were born, only three of whom survive him, their son, George W., a prominent granite manufacturer, having died about a year ago now.

In 1861 he enlisted from East Montpelier in the Civil War in Company H, 2nd Vermont Regiment, and he served his country faithfully for three years and 20 days, never being wounded.

Upon his discharge from the army, he and Mrs. Trow came to Hardwick he has been a booster for the town, first, last, and always, and was always to be found interested in anything that tended toward the development of the place, and his profession as building contractor brought him into close touch with all the industrial activities of Hardwick at its best.

He helped as much if not more than any other man in building up the place when the granite business received its start and built many houses of his own, and blocks, residences and stonesheds for others. He built the Congregational Church, the M. E. Parsonage, and was always ready ad willing to liberally assist in furthering any business enterprises. He as interested with his son, George W., in the Chrystal Brook Granite company, one of the most active manufacturing concerns in town up to the time of his son's death.

He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, but was not the man to be away from home very much, his home being his ideal in life, and his sole aim and ambition was by his toil to accumulate something for his children. He was a very active man up to the very last. He was also a staunch member of the Baptist Church.

He is survived by his wife, three daughters, Mrs. Henry DeFord and Mrs. T. E. Angeli of this place and Mrs. Mae Allen of Rutland, Vt., a half-brother, Charles Keniston of Providence, R. I., a half sister, Mrs. Emma Wheeler of North Montpelier, several grand-children and 20 great-grandchildren, to whom is extended deepest sympathy in their hour of sorrow and bereavement.

Mr. Trow will not only be greatly missed in his own, but in the business life of Hardwick.

Source: Hardwick Gazette, December 5, 1918.
Courtesy of Tom Boudreau.