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Pierce, Charles Alexander

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 23, credited to Manchester, VT
Unit(s): 14th VT INF
Service: enl 8/28/62, m/i 10/21/62, 1SGT, Co. C, 14th VT INF, disch 5/11/63

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 1839, Chester, VT
Death: 03/09/1915

Burial: Prospect Hill Cemetery, Brattleboro, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Bob Edwards
Findagrave Memorial #: 17961734

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes, 5/18/1863; widow Abbie S., 3/23/1915, MA
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: None

DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

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Tombstone

Prospect Hill Cemetery, Brattleboro, VT

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Biography

Pierce, Charles Alexander, of Bennington, son of James and Dorcas Bayard Pierce, was born in Chester, August 22, 1839.

He was educated in the common schools, and at the age of sixteen entered the office of the Brattleboro Phoenix, where he served his apprenticeship. In 1861 he established the Manchester (Vt.) Journal, which he continued to publish for nine years, but finally purchased the Bennington Banner, which he now owns, and in connection with this is the proprietor of one of the largest job printing, bookbinding, and publishing establishments in the state. He was appointed postmaster at Bennington in 1891 by President Harrison.

He enlisted in Co. C, 14th Regt. Vt. Vols., of which company he was 1st sergeant, and on account of an accidental injury received his discharge in May 1863.

Mr. Pierce wedded Abby, daughter of Isaac W. and Maria Gibson, of Londonderry. Their children are: Charles W., Warren A., and Nettie M.

Source: Jacob G. Ullery, compiler, Men of Vermont: An Illustrated Biographical History of Vermonters and Sons of Vermont, (Transcript Publishing Company, Brattleboro, VT, 1894), Part II, pp. 313.

Obituary

RECENT DEATHS
Charles Alexander Pierce

Charles Alexander Pierce, proprietor of The Waltham (Mass) Evening News and a veteran newspaper man of varied experience, died March 9, at his home in Waltham, where for the past 14 months he had been ill. Last fall he gave up the personal management of his business.

Mr. Pierce was born August 22, 1839 in Chester, the son of James and Dorcas (Bayard) Pierce. At the age of 16 he went to Brattleboro and learned the printer's trade in The Phoenix office, where he worked until 1861, when he went to Manchester and founded the Manchester Journal.

In 1862 Mr. Pierce enlisted in Company C, 14th Vt. Regiment and served as first sergeant, but in May, 1863, he was discharged because of injuries received in camp, and returned to Manchester. There he remained until 1872, when he sold The Journal and bought The Bennington Banner. He remained proprietor of The Banner for a quarter of a century and became one of the most prominent citizens of the town. During President Harrison's administration Mr. Pierce was postmaster at Bennington.

Mr. Pierce, in 1897, sold The Banner and went to Northampton as owner of The Daily Herald, ut in 1906 he sold this, in turn, bought The Waltham Evening News and removed to Waltham, where he since had run the paper and a general printing business.

A Republican in national and state affairs, Mr. Pierce was non-partisan in local matters. He was an active member of the F. P. H. Rogers Post, No. 23, G. A. R., and in Vermont he had been a prominent Mason and Knight Templar, but had never transferred to a Massachusetts lodge. He is survived by his wife, who was Miss Abby Gibson of Londonderry, two sons, Charles W. Pierce and Warren Pierce, associated in business with him, and a daughter, Mrs. Charles A. Burgess, all of Waltham.

Source: St. Albans Weekly Messenger, March 18, 1915.
Courtesy of Tom Boudreau.