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Ingram, Seth H.

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 0, credited to Bradford, VT
Unit(s): 1st MA HARTY
Service: 1st MA HVY ARTY

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VITALS

Birth: 1848, Unknown
Death: 06/05/1890

Burial: Upper Plain Cemetery, Bradford, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: R. N. Ward Jr.
Findagrave Memorial #: 95805674

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes, 5/24/1872
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: None

DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

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Tombstone

Upper Plain Cemetery, Bradford, VT

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Obituary

GASPED AND DIED
Seth H. Ingram's Sudden Death on Train from Worcester

A well-dressed man of gentlemanly bearing, about 45 years, old, boarded the New York train due to arrive in Boston at 1 o'clock, at Worcester, last evening.

Immediately after the train started he was seen to gasp violently, and despite the efforts of a New York physician and a number of of friends he died in about 10 minutes.

He was recognized as Seth H. Ingram, an old and valued employee of Hawley, Folsom & Martin's, wholesale dealers in gents' furnishings, 27 Otis st., this city.

The ascribed cause of death was heart failure.

Upon the arrival of the train in Boston the body was taken in charge by Undertaker Jones.

At the Langham Hotel, from where the news of his death was conveyed to his two sisters living on Dudley st., the intelligence was received with the sorrow attendant with an acquaintance extending over many years.

He was unmarried and employed by the above-mentioned firm in the capacity of house salesman, making short trips at infrequent periods, of which that of yesterday to Worcester was one.

Source: Boston Globe, June 6, 1890
Courtesy of Tom Boudreau.