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Bond, Henry Asa

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 18, credited to Jamaica, VT
Unit(s): 11th VT INF
Service: enl 8/11/62, m/i 9/1/62, Pvt, Co. G, 11th VT INF, pr CPL 6/12/65, wdd, Petersburg, 4/2/65, m/o 6/24/65

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 12/29/1845, Winhall, VT
Death: 04/24/1914

Burial: Pleasant View Cemetery, Chester, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Emily Hackett
Findagrave Memorial #: 111887187

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes, 7/14/1879; widow Olivia, 5/7/1914
Portrait?: GAR Post #27, 1907
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: None

Webmaster's Note: The 11th Vermont Infantry was also known as the 1st Vermont Heavy Artillery; the names were used interchangably for most of its career


DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

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Tombstone

Tombstone



Pleasant View Cemetery, Chester, VT

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Biography

BOND, Henry, Deacon. Born Winhall, Vt., 29 Dec., 1845, son of Asa & Alzina (Axtell) Bond. he m. Oliva Kingsbury. He d. 24 April, 1914 (age 69). d. on Friday night while preparing to attend the Grange meeting when he was stricken with a paralytic shock from which he never regained consciousness, took him away about 11 o'clock. He suffered a similar shock about a year ago from which he recovered. Soldier of the Civil War, Co. "G", 11th Reg't Vt. Vols., discharged as Corporal. He was one of 3 children of his parents; early life spent in Winhall & Jamaica. He m. in Jamaica 14 Jan., 1873. He served as lister, road commissioner, and 4 years ago elected to Vt. legislature; constable for 20 years, and deputy sheriff for 8 years. A farmer all his life. He first came to Chester & lived on the Minor farm. 20 years ago he came to live on the farm where he died. First he worked for Geo. Allen and since his death he carried on the farm for Mrs. Allen. Surv: widow, (2) daus: Mrs. Harold Amsden, Worcester, Mass.; Mrs. Harvey Wilson, Chester. Funeral 2 o'clock Tues, Baptist church. Rev. R. M. Jones, assisted by Rev. Henry Crocker. The great esteem in which Mr. Bond was held by the entire community is shown by the very large attendance at the funeral service. The church was filled to its capacity and by the profusion of floral offerings which consisted of beautiful cut flowers and many elaborate pieces. Mr. Bond, by his cheerful disposition, his courage to do what he though was right and his honesty, gained for him a host of friends, by whom he will me missed. --16 July, 1914: J. A. Smith of Cavendish has secured a pension for Olivia, widow of Henry A. Bond, a Civil War soldier, at the rate of twelve dollars per month."

Information provided by Linda M. Welch, Dartmouth College.

Obituary

CHESTER

Fully 500 people attended the funeral of Henry A. Bond Tuesday afternoon in the Baptist church. Mr. Bond died last Friday evening very suddenly from the effects of a second shock of paralysis at his home here. Rev. Ralph M. Jones, the pastor, was assisted by Rev. Henry Crocker, a former pastor of the church. The burial was in the family lot in Pleasant View cemetery. Every seat in the church was occupied and chairs were brought in to accommodate many persons. The bearers were H. M. Guild, D. B. Chandler, C. F. Butterfield, George Parker, D. W. Davis and H. E. Huntley, all intimate friends of Mr. Bond. All the orders of which Mr. Bond was a member, attended the funeral in a body, and were largely represented. They included the G. A. R., the Masons, Odd Fellows, Grange and Order of the Eastern Star. There was a profusion of floral tributes. There was singing by a male quartet, L. A. Carpenter, P. H. Blake, Raymond Pollard and William S. Pollard. Two selections were given.

Source: Rutland Daily Herald, April 29, 1914.
Courtesy of Tom Boudreau.