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Bowman, Edward E.

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 18, credited to Sunderland, VT
Unit(s): 9th VT INF
Service: enl 12/4/63, m/i 12/24/63, Pvt, Co. E, 9th VT INF, tr to Co. B, 6/13/65, m/o 12/1/65

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 03/06/1848, Manchester, VT
Death: 05/17/1905

Burial: Evergreen Cemetery, Rutland, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Jennifer Snoots
Findagrave Memorial #: 32512204

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes, 6/28/1880; widow Emma M., 6/1/1905, VT
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: None

Webmaster's Note: If this soldier enlisted before 9/1/62, and was with the regiment on 9/13/62, he would have briefly been taken prisoner along with the entire regiment at Harper's Ferry. Read the blue section of the unit's Organization and Service for details.


DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

Copyright notice

Tombstone

Evergreen Cemetery, Rutland, VT

Check the cemetery for location/directions and other veterans who may be buried there.


Edward Bowman

Rutland Daily Herald, May 18, 1905:

Capt. Edward Bowman, a civil war veteran and formerly one of the best known horsemen in New England, died very suddenly at his home on North Main street at 6.15 o'clock last night of hemorrhage of the brain, aged 57 years. Since September, 1903, when he had a shock, his health had been poor, and he had suffered from heart trouble. Yesterday he returned from a trip down street after 5 o'clock.

Mr. Bowman was born at Manchester March 6, 1848, and was the son of Eleaser and Mary Bowman. He lived there until 15 years old, when he enlisted in company E, 9th Vermont regiment. He served at Harper's Ferry and in the campaign in Virginia. During the last eight months of his enlistment he was orderly for Gen O.L. Mann. He was mustered out in December, 1865.

Returning to Manchester Mr. Bowman learned the stone cutter's trade. In the spring of 1872 he came toRutland and opened a marble shop on Grove street, employing 20 men. This flourished for 11 years, when, on account of the ill health of the owner, it was given up, and Mr. Bowman began to raise high blooded horses.

These were of Morgan and Wilkes stock. Among the many fast horses bred by Capt. Bowman were John J., the highest priced harness horse that ever went out of Vermont, and Emma B., Katrina, by Daniel Lambert. He also owned Ned Wilkes, by Alcantara. Many of the horses raised by Capt. Bowman sold for $1000 each and upwards. Besides being a breeder of note, Capt. Bowman also was well-known as a starter of races. For many years he acted as starter at Great Barrington, Mass., and other places in Massachusetts, Vermont, New York state and New Hampshire.

He acted for the last time in this capacity in this city and Great Barrington, Mass., during the fall of 1903.

Mr. Bowman was a member of Roberts Grand Army post and at one time was an Odd Fellow. In 1900 he was chief of police for this city. He served on the staff of Dr. C.F. Branch of Newport, when the latter was department commander of the Grand Army. Since 1872 he had been a member of the local Baptist church. For the last three years he traveled, selling marble.

Mr. Bowman was married June 26, 1873 , to Miss Emma Maranville, in this place. Only one child was born to them.

Mrs. Bowman survives, with one daughter, Mrs. S.T. Pearson of this city; two brothers, Eleaser of Glens Falls, N.Y., and A.H. of New Britain, Ct., and three sisters, Mrs. H.E. Taylor and Mrs. F.N. Steele of New Britain, Ct., and Mrs. F.C. Archibald of Hartford, Ct.

The funeral will be held at the Baptist church Saturday. Burial will be in Evergreen cemetery, Roberts Grand Army post having charge of the services at the grave.


Rutland Daily Herald, May 20, 1905:

Many people attended the funeral of Capt. Edward Bowman, which was held at the Baptist church at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon. Prayers were said at the house at 12.30 o'clock by Rev. Dr. Gibbs Braislin, the ceremony being private.

From 1 until 2 o'clock the body was viewed at the Baptist church. At 2 o'clock the funeral services were held in the church. Rev. Dr. Gibbs Braislin and Rev. Allan H. Bissell officiating.

The regular church choir sang "Lead, Kindly Light" and "Jesus, Lover of My Soul."

Roberts Grand Army Post, of which Mr. Bowman was a member, attended in a body to the number of 100, as did about 60 members of the Woman's Relief Corps.

Among the floral tributes was a pillow of pink and white roses, bearing the word "brother"; a policeman's stick four feet long, of pink and white roses and carnations, men who served on the police force with Capt. Bowman; a maltese cross of pink and white roses and smylax, from Roberts Woman's Relief Corps; a Greek cross of pink and white roses from Mill Village Circle of King's Sons and Daughters, of which Capt. Bowman was a member; an anchor of pink and white roses and carnations King's Daughters of the Advent Christian church, of which Mrs. Bowman is a member; a bouquet of Easter lilies and pink roses Baptist Sunday school class, of which his daughter, Mrs. S.T. Pearson, is a member; a large cluster of pink roses and smylax from Mrs. L.F. Brehmer, teacher of the class; and 57 white carnations, one for each year of Mr. Bowman's life, family. There were also many flowers from friends.

In addition to the usual flag placed on the coffin by the Grand Army, Gen. E.H. Ripley of New York city placed upon it the tattered silk flag which Capt. Bowman's regiment, the 9th Vermont, carried through the war.

The honorary bearers were Gen. E.H. Ripley of New York city, C.S. Albee of this city, both of the 9th Vermont, John A. Sheldon and H.W. Spafford, all members of Roberts post. The pall bearers were John Clifford, Jeremiah Canty, Thomas Dyer and John Smith, policemen under Capt. Bowman in 1900, and George W. Kenney and E.M. Knox of the Grand Army.

Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. A.H. Bowman, E.C. Bowman and Mrs. F.M. Steele of New Britain, Ct., Frederick Archibald and Miss Maud Archibald of Hartford, Ct., Mr. And Mrs. Eleaser Bowman and Miss Jennie Bowman of Glens Falls, N.Y., G.R. Bowman of Castleton, E.L. Maranville of Poultney and Edward Simms of Troy, N.Y.

Burial was in Evergreen cemetery.

Contributed by Jen Snoots.